Why the science of “human nature” is not to be feared

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Censoring studies of the biology of cognitive and behavioral differences will not prevent grievances that may unnecessarily justify them.





Iris Berendt (translated by Peggy Saster)

The desire to restrict the flag because it might become stigmatized is counterproductive (illustration pictorial).
© Jérémie FULLERINGER / MAXPPP / PHOTOPQR / L’YONNE REPUBLICAINE / MAXPPP

DrBecoming a parent often means starting to ask questions about human nature. If you have children, you may have noticed their differences early on. The first time my son heard music, his eyes widened, as if he was staring at the notes in the air. My daughter clearly has a thing for social interaction. At 3 months old, this bitch was using her only tooth to bite me and watch my reaction. No wonder my son became a composer, and my daughter went into psychology.

Are they born like this? Does nature shape who we are? Since the advent of cognitive science, neuroscience, and behavioral genetics, this timeless question has appeared in the blink of an eye. body Scientist…


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About the Author: Irene Alves

"Bacon ninja. Guru do álcool. Explorador orgulhoso. Ávido entusiasta da cultura pop."

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